Posts Tagged: Brewery

Birds on Tap – Yup, That’s a Thing

Nothing goes better with a cold one than a bird. Think about it – fried chicken, wings – nothing takes down a case of beer munchies like . . .

(Hold on, I’m being told that this blog post is supposed to be about the growing popularity of combining bird watching with craft brewery tours.)

At any rate, our good friends at the Maine Brew Bus are again teaming up with Derek Lovitch of Freeport Wild Bird Supply to offer a series of tours throughout the year that will allow you dear reader, to check out some of the finest fowl our great state has to offer while simultaneously visiting some great local breweries.

Details about last year’s Birds on Tap events here. For this year’s tour dates, check out this and this.

No promises, but if you go to one of these events, I think we all know what you’ll be saying.

Please follow and like us:

Whiskey Distilled from Beer? Yes, Please!

Cool story in yesterday’s Portland Press Herald about collaboration between a couple of prominent locals: Liquid Riot has distilled some leftover Sebago Brewing beer (Bonfire Rye ale) to produce a whiskey-like liquor called Bonfire Spirit. Starting April 28th, Sebago will be selling it at its four brewpubs. One catch: there are just 200 12-ounce bottles so it will go fast.

The PPH story details the process in which Sebago and Liquid Riot ended up working together on the creation and also recaps some of the other cross pollination that goes on in the local scene between bars, brewers and distillers.

All and all, some nice publicity for Sebago and Liquid Riot and a good look at the history of southern Maine brewers working with their colleagues/competitors.

Please follow and like us:

New England Brew Summit

This coming Friday, April 1st (insert obligatory April Fools joke), The Abromson Center at the University of Southern Maine will serve as host for the first ever New England Craft Brew Summit. I hope all of our readers will have a chance to attend as the event looks to be incredibly informative and, obviously, a really great time.

But I think this event speaks to a larger point that is incredibly important for our community. Craft beverage makers are having an impact on the New England economy that extends far beyond their tasting rooms or storefronts. The number of supporting industry members attending speaks for itself. But it is great to see that this opportunity for Maine and New England at large is attracting the attention of some of our politicians, as both Senator Angus King and Representative Chellie Pingree will be in attendance at the event. All in all, it looks to be a great time, and the event bodes well for the growth of the craft beer and alcoholic beverage industry in New England.

Please follow and like us:

Want to Operate a Tasting Room? You’ll Need to Pay Up First.

The Portland City Council voted on Monday to require Portland breweries to pay a $500 fee to operate their tasting rooms. According to the Portland Press Herald article linked below, Councilor Suslovic believes the city has a legitimate public safety concern in regulating tasting rooms. The vote is likely also in response to recent complaints from bar owners, who feel the breweries have an advantage over bars. Regardless of the reasons for the vote, the license requirement goes into effect next month.

Portland Press Herald article here: http://www.pressherald.com/2016/03/21/portland-imposes-500-fee-on-breweries-with-tasting-rooms/

Please follow and like us:

Portland to Beer Drinkers: Get Your Snack On

Now that’s what we’re talkin bout.

Reversing one of the worst decisions of all time, officials in beer Mecca Portland, Maine, (known principally as the home to this humble blog), will now allow breweries located in the City’s industrial zones to sell prepackaged food at their tasting rooms. Appears, however, that this victory for snack enthusiasts will come with a price – literally. In conjunction with permitting food sales, the City looks set to create a new license for breweries, distilleries and wineries, which will cost them an additional $500.

Stories here and here.

Please follow and like us: