Archives: February 2016

Will Mass. Pay to Play Scandal Affect Maine Brewers?

A ruling involving the business practices of a Massachusetts-based beer distributor may keep Maine-brewed beers out of bars, restaurants and other retailers for 90 days.

On Friday, the Massachusetts Alcoholic Beverages Control Commission suspended the Craft Brewers Guild’s license for 90 days for engaging in a scheme in which the company gave money to bars in greater Boston to serve specific beers. CBG distributes beers for a number of Maine craft brewers, including Allagash, Sebago Brewing, Gritty McDuff’s, Geary’s and Maine Beer Company.

Stories here (playing up the Maine aspect of the ruling) and here (more Boston-centric and discussing CBG’s business practices in depth). The decision should be here, however, as of the time we posted, the Alcoholic Beverages Control Commission had not yet made it available.

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NYT: Blue Ox is Good for Planet

Cool story recently that gave some national publicity to a local business.

Saturday’s Times reported on cover crops – noncash crops that farmers plant between harvests to improve soil health and manage erosion. Part of the story discussed Lisbon Falls’ own Blue Ox Malthouse, including a quote from founder Joel Alex about helping farmers make money off their cover crops

Story here. More on Blue Ox here and here. More on cover crops/environmentally sustainable farming here.

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Nuts and Bolts of Registering Your Brewery Name

We have previously covered the process for developing your brewery/distillery/winery’s name, including the essential step of clearance. Once you have found and cleared the perfect name, the next step is to protect it. The best way to protect your name is by registering it as a trademark with the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO).

The first step in the registration process is determining what type of mark you are going to register. There are two broad types of marks: standard character marks or stylized marks. A standard character mark protects the word or words you are using, without reference to the font, size, color, shape, etc. of the characters. In contrast, a stylized mark is designed to protect more specialized marks, such as an artistic logo or stylized fonts, shapes, colors. A standard mark provides protection for your name, preventing others from using the words you have registered no matter how they attempt to dress or stylize them. If you have developed a company name and an associated logo, often times it makes sense to register both the words (as a standard character mark) and the logo itself as a stylized mark. (more…)

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Portland to Beer Drinkers: Get Your Snack On

Now that’s what we’re talkin bout.

Reversing one of the worst decisions of all time, officials in beer Mecca Portland, Maine, (known principally as the home to this humble blog), will now allow breweries located in the City’s industrial zones to sell prepackaged food at their tasting rooms. Appears, however, that this victory for snack enthusiasts will come with a price – literally. In conjunction with permitting food sales, the City looks set to create a new license for breweries, distilleries and wineries, which will cost them an additional $500.

Stories here and here.

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Stroudwater Spirits: Looking for Investors

More news about Maine companies in the beer/wine/distilleries space: North Star Brands, LLC of Portland, which includes Stroudwater Spirits (maker of small-batch bourbon, whiskey, vodka and gin), recently filed with the SEC to raise $750,000 in an equity offering. The offering hasn’t gone on sale yet, however when it does, the minimum investment will cost you a cool $25,000.

Along with Bissell Brothers and Cellardoor Winery, Stroudwater Spirits has also recently announced plans to lease space at the Thompson’s Point development in Portland.

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